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Thread: How to decontaminate domestic animal or human urine on upholstery of all leather types?

  1. #1

    Question How to decontaminate domestic animal or human urine on upholstery of all leather types?

    How to decontaminate domestic animal (cat dog)/Human urine from pigmented (protected/top coated) and unprotected (semi-aniline, wax/oil pullups, Nubuck, full aniline) upholstery leathers? We might get some discussion on protected vs semi-protected vs unprotected but the bottom line is we have a stain on these that must be removed and decontaminated.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Standard Urine Decontamination for All Leather Types.

    The banner above shows a variety of leathers that has been urine contaminated from various reasons

    - bladder control from elderly people, changing of baby nappies, young child nappies overflow while sleeping on the sofa, etc.

    Cats most often does it on cushion and dogs spray on corners.

    Since I am doing the bag on the right side I shall talk about how I do the decontamination.

    It is an aniline/suede combination design by Francesco Biasia® 6 months old from Italy.

    Her 17 years old male cat urinated on it, where you can see the wet stain.

    The priority request was to treat the wet urine mark invincible and the urine smell removed too.

    Here are the steps for urine stains that are “still wet”.

    Step 1 - Urine Extraction
    Absorb as much liquid out of it as possible and turn out the lining (in this case is a bag/purse).

    Step 2 - Uric Acid Removal
    d’Protein11.0™ (pH value 11.0 is a protein based spotting agent for vomit, urine, eggs, milk, creams on all leathers).
    It is spray on and agitate with leatherBrush1™ (horsehair) saturating the urine stain leather structure areas deep where the urine has penetrated.
    Let it dwell for 5 to 15 minutes for chemical reaction and extract as much of the uric acid contaminants as possible without scratching or
    damaging the sensitive aniline leather.
    The purpose is to remove the protein components to minimize the attraction of natural bacteria from the atmosphere from digesting and
    fermenting the protein contaminants.

    Picture #1 - Urine Mark


    Picture #2 - Spray, Agitate & Dwell



    Picture #3 - Extract


    Step 3 - Ammonia and Phosphorus Salt Removal
    d’Urine2.2™ (pH value 2.2 is an urine ammonia and phosphorus salt neutralizing agent from “reverse-tanning” on all leathers).
    It is similarly spray on and agitate with similar brush to saturate the urine stains leather structure deep where the urine and d’Protein11.0™ has penetrated.
    Let it dwell for 5 to 15 minutes for chemical reaction to take place and thereafter extract as dry as possible.
    This is a dual function approach first it is to eliminate the presence of ammonia and phosphorus salt that will turn alkaline as high as pH 9.5 to 10 from bacteria
    activities.
    The urea that becomes ammonia will break the bonds between the tanning agent and the protein fibers and migrate out as black residue in chrome leather
    as shown on one of the above banner (green semi-aniline leather with black “tanning residue” stains).
    Vegetable-tanned leather is more ammonia sensitive than Chrome-Tanned leathers.
    The high pH exposure from the leather neutral of 3-5 also cause original anionic (-) fatliquor to break bonds (that's the reason for stiffness from a leach out fatliquor).
    As dyes are mostly acidic in nature too, this high pH destabilizes the dyestuff as it moves away from the centre to form rings with most color loss from the center.
    The other purpose of this low pH of 2.2 is to neutralize the high pH of 11.0 to bring the pH to leather neutral of 3-5.

    Picture #4 Ammonia & Phosphorus Salt Removal


    Step 4 - Inspection Of Spots & Stains with a Magnifying Glass (not urine related)

    Picture #5 - Close-Up Inspection


    Step 5 - Oil Based Stains Removal (not urine related)
    d’Oil4.4™ (pH value 4.4 is a leather safe dye transfer, oil and grease mild spotting agent for all leathers).

    Picture #6 - Spoting


    Step 6 - Heavier Solvent Based Stains Removal (not urine related)
    d’Ink7.7™ (pH value 7.7 is a general silicone, oil, grease, dye transfer and ink spotting agent for all leathers).

    Picture #7 - Spotting


    Picture #8 (leatherTool6™)



    Step 7. - General Degreasing
    d’Grease4.9™ (pH value 4.9 is an aqueous leather safe degreaser like oil, dressing, butter or lotion for all leathers).
    Spray on heavy soil areas and feather out entire section of the leather/suede combination with leatherBrush1™ on aniline leather and a choice of nubuckBrush2™ or suedeBrush3™ with nubuckEraser5™ on the suede section and let it dwell 5 to 15 minutes before extraction.

    Picture #9 - Degreasing


    Picture #10 - nubuckEraser5™



    Step 8 - General Cleaning
    clean3.8™ (pH value 3.8 is a leather safe aqueous general purpose cleaner for all leathers).
    Spray, agitate with appropriate brush and extract.

    Picture #11 - General Cleaning.



    Step 9 - Acidifying Rinse
    rinse3.0™ (pH value 3.0 is a leather safe aqueous mild acidifier all purpose rinse for all leathers).
    Spray soak, agitate with appropriate brush and extract.

    Picture #12 - Acidifying Rinsing



    Step 10 - Fatliquoring
    fatliquor5.0™ (pH value ±5.0 is an anionic (-) charged micro emulsion fatliquor for softening and strengthening all leathers).
    Spray and spread soak with a foam brush to work into the leather structure with even penetration.

    Picture #13 - Spray Fatliquoring


    Picture #14 - Spread it for more effective penetrating into the leather structure.


    Step 11
    leatherScent’B™ (is a non film-forming, non-stick tactile feel conditioner to enhance a soft natural buttery feel with a classic leather scent).
    Spray and spread with a foam brush.

    Picture #15 - To impart the original classic leather scent!



    Questions are welcome,

    or share with us your experience?

    Roger Koh
    Leather Doctor® System
    Last edited by Roger Koh; 08-23-2008 at 12:48 PM. Reason: last sentence

  3. #3
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    Default An insert for in between the Acidifying Rinse and the Fatliquoring

    Step 9A.
    d’Bacteria3.7™ (pH value 3.7 is a leather safe, biodegradable, odorless and colorless bactericide to kill organic odors for all leathers).
    Spray soaks onto stain area to sterilize against organic odor.

    Picture #12A - Sterilize against Organic Odor



    Roger Koh

  4. #4

    Smile Urine decontamination

    Great shots. Would there be any changes to the procedures if the stain were not 'fresh' but more like the black one (green sofa) or the others that have been sitting for a time? Also did you force dry after extraction since it looks like you got limited wetting of the aniline? Most upholstery anilines we have seen here will immediately turn dark with even a spray on cleaner.

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Leatherestore View Post

    Most upholstery anilines we have seen here will immediately turn dark with even a spray on cleaner.
    Please, could you let us know the pH value of products that you use?

    I may be able to tell you why!

    Your other two questions I will post later.

    Roger Koh

  6. #6
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Leatherestore View Post
    Would there be any changes to the procedures if the stain were not 'fresh' but more like the black one (green sofa) or the others that have been sitting for a time?
    Dried Urine Stain decontamination procedure:

    Picture #1 - The Cat.


    Picture #2 - The Black and White Stains.


    Picture #3 - The close-up that went beyond the leather.


    Picture #4 - Through the furniture structure onto the dust cloth.


    Prolonged Dried out Urine Stain:

    What we see sometimes is a combination of black stains (tanning agent) with white powdery residues (phosphorus, ammonia or other salt, etc) on aged urine stains and also resulted in stiff leather.

    This cat has obediently done it many times to this sofa in the basement for almost half a year on the same spot (was told).

    This is a sign of “reverse tanning” where the tanning agent, fatliquor, dyestuff (and other leather chemistry constituents) breaks bond with the protein fiber.

    The ammonia high pH value raises the protein fiber above the iso-electric point thus reversing the protein fiber charges to an anionic (-) charge that causes breaking of hydrogen bonds (like poles repel, ions hydrogen bonding behaves just like a magnet).

    The stiffness is the result of lost of fatliquor that need to be replenished to regain softness and strength with fatliquor5.0™.

    Discoloration or loss of dyes or colors needs matching refinishing.

    “Reverse tanning” or leather denaturing is an ammonia high pH phenomenon that revert the leather back to raw hide.

    Theoretically speaking it can be “re-tan” (that is a long process of Decontamination > Soaking > Pickling > Tanning > Fatliquoring > Dyeing > Refinishing > Sensuous Conditioning).

    In practice it is tedious as the leather in question may have to be dismantle for proper Soaking > Pickling > Tanning.


    How do we decontaminate it?

    Step 1 - Dry Soil Removal.
    Using appropriate brushes like leatherBrush1™, nubuckBrush2™ or suedeBrush3™ follows with thorough vacuuming.

    Step 2 - Dry Soil Removal Continues.
    Using anilineEraser4™ for all smooth leathers and nubuckEraser5™ for all suede and nubuck.

    Step 3 - Uric Acid Removal
    Spray soak with d’Protein11.0™ agitate > dwell > extract.

    Step 4 - Ammonia and Phosphorus Salt Removal.
    Spray soak with d’Urine2.2™ agitate > dwell > extract.

    Step 5 - Tackiness or Sliminess Rectification.
    Spray soak with acidifier2.0™ agitate > dwell > extract until a squeaky (healthy) wet feel.

    Step 6 - General Degreasing the entire panel.
    Spray d’Grease4.9™ agitate > dwell > extract.

    Step 7 - General Cleaning
    Spray clean3.8™ agitate > extract.

    Step 8 - Restore Leather Chemistry Integrity
    Spray rinse3.0™ agitate > extract until towel shows clean.

    Step 8 a - Organic Odor Control
    Spray d'Bacteria3.7™ to sterilize agianst organic odor from bacteria activities.

    Step 9 - Rehydration for entire panel (Avoid blotchiness especially semi-aniline leathers)
    Spray relaxer3.3 agitate for even absorption (a clear plastic sheet to cover helps even out blotchiness).

    Step 10 - Restore Leather Softness and Strength.
    Spray fatliquor5.0™ and spread with a foam brush for even penetration and allow for very slow drying overnight.

    Step 11 - Restore coarse break, crease and wrinkle with heat treatment.
    Iron over paper/Teflon with ordinary iron without steam.

    Step 12 - Restore the original classic leather scent.
    Spray and spread leatherScent’B™, D, S or W to enhance the leather sensuously with choice of a non-stick buttery, draggy, silky or waxy feel.

    Welcome your question!

    Roger Koh
    Leather Doctor® System
    Last edited by Roger Koh; 08-27-2008 at 02:53 PM. Reason: An insert between 8 and 9

  7. #7

    Cool

    Is there a photo of the completed product?

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Leatherestore View Post
    Is there a photo of the completed product?


    Here are the 37 Cleaning & Conditioning Products - Part 1 of 4.






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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Leatherestore View Post
    Also did you force dry after extraction since it looks like you got limited wetting of the aniline?


    No force drying after extraction necessary as we want the leather structure to be hydrated for effective fatliquoring.

    But not necessary over-flooding the inter-fibrillary spaces but allowing fatliquoring to be easily redistribute itself throughout the leather structure once applied.

    As fatliquoring is the final stage of the wet cleaning process, it is also left for slow drying without force drying for extra softness when dry.

    Roger Koh.

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