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Thread: Restoring poorly repaired vintage sheepskin

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2021
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    2

    Default Restoring poorly repaired vintage sheepskin

    Hi,

    I have a vintage sheepskin coat (possibly from the 60s) that had a small tear in it. It was repaired by two furriers; the first just sewed up the tear (which came apart almost immediately), and the second actually did a redesign both to update the overall look and also to hide the repair to the rip. Unfortunately, that also didn't last (this can be seen in the first picture from the link below).

    I've purchased both the Hydrator 3.3 and the Fatliquor 5.0. I'm wondering if applying these to the coat will make the new repairs worse (by slightly shrinking and thereby pulling on the stitching)? I would attach images here but for some reason am unable to upload them here, so here's a link to the pictures of the coat: https://imgur.com/a/5p2h52f

    The pictures were taken after applying the Hydrator and Fatliquor. I noticed the stitching coming apart after applying the solutions, which is why I'm posting. Hope that all makes sense!

    PS: Also, just wanted to make sure that I'm using the correct products, and that this coat is indeed restore-able. I had a conversation with a leather specialist in the area and was told that it's pretty much impossible to fix dried-out leather like this.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Greater Vancouver, Canada.
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    4,868

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    >>> I had a conversation with a leather specialist in the area and was told that it's pretty much impossible to fix dried-out leather like this.

    The only way to find out is to test the products on a variety of sheepskin.

    As there are also a few versions of tanning the skin too.

    Chrome-tanned skin would be not a problem, Alum Tanned skin is not a true tanned, thus may have water content issues.

    You will also notice that some sheepskin is machine washable, and some are not.

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    Roger Koh
    Leather, Skin, Hair, Eye & Acne Care System Formulator
    Consultant / Practitioner / Instructor / Coach
    web: www.leatherdoctor.com
    forum: www.leathercleaningrestorationforum.com
    email: [email protected]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Greater Vancouver, Canada.
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    Default

    >>> It was repaired by two furriers; the first just sewed up the tear (which came apart almost immediately), and the second actually did a redesign both to update the overall look and also to hide the repair to the rip. Unfortunately, that also didn't last (this can be seen in the first picture from the link below).

    I would recommend a bonding repair with Bond-3D and using suede fibers to camouflage the repairs . . . never fails.

    You may ask your furriers to talk to me, the methods I practice too.

    Online coaching also an option @ US$99 an hour and I will walk you through the repair process.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2021
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    >>>I would recommend a bonding repair with Bond-3D and using suede fibers to camouflage the repairs . . . never fails.

    Just to double-check: Will this process also work with donor material from the same coat? During the redesign process, there was some leftover sheepskin left.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Greater Vancouver, Canada.
    Posts
    4,868

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    Yes, always used the material from the same piece for repairs.

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