Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Ford Edge Leather Repair Plan Evaluation

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    4

    Default Ford Edge Leather Repair Plan Evaluation

    Hey everyone,

    So I'd like to run my "battle plan," across you all in this forum for a seat repair project on my 2010 Ford Edge. I had very good success with my first repair except for the color match and not using a clear coat. This repair is on my personal car and I'm looking to create a permanent fix and respray both front seats all around.

    My plan is to remove the seats from the car to prevent over spray and get a more even coat of paint on. The first step will be to repair the one small rip in the leather (you can barely see it so I'm lucky). I will not try to remove the slight wear creases in the leather and sanding it down would remove the texture and I don't mind the leather being creased slightly (it hasn't caused a break in the leather or the dye so I think I am in the clear).

    Next would be to begin the re-spray process. I will color match my water based dye then spray through an HLVP gun (after taping up the seat as to not spray stitching and plastics on the seat base).

    After allowing the seat to dry then I will clear coat the seat let dry then replace in the vehicle. This process will be used on the three arm rests (door arm rests and center console). The drivers seat has no dye loss so I will first respray the backrest and seat base with clear coat and blend into the sides due to only being dull on these parts.

    Here are some pictures of the worse off seat (passenger seat). The drivers seat does not have any dye loss but has lost its gloss and since I am already going to be elbow deep in work, I may as well correct it with respraying clear coat.
    Attached Images Attached Images     

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Greater Vancouver, Canada.
    Posts
    4,806

    Default

    I should share with you the system requirement to have a lasting refinishing rather then brands which mean very little in terms of knowledge.

    Step-1 -
    Ensure that the existing finished is grease free with Degreaser-2.2 > Acidifier-2.0 system.

    Step-2 -
    Deteriorating finishes to be removed as much as possible to reach the crust without sanding the crust.

    Step-3 -
    The weak links of needle holes, perforation and absorbing creases to be rejuvenated for leather suppleness. Otherwise crusty leather becomes easily develop creases and eventually cracks before its time. Leather softening is performed with Hydrator-3.3 > Fatliquor-5.0 > Hydrator-3.3 system.

    Step-4 -
    Any fat and oil residue is to be removed with Hydrator-3.3 to a squeaky clean to ensure no hindrance to the refinishing system.

    Step-5 -
    Repairs are optional and there are repairs just for show and cracks before its time and repairs that becomes part of leather that becomes stronger than surrounding areas.

    Step-6 -
    A primer or adhesion promotion is used to ensure micropilling of the color coat into the porous crust. Adhesion-73 is scrub to remove deteriorating finishes as well.

    Step-7 -
    A micro thin water based product like Micro-54, the thinner the coating the more elastic it can be.

    Step-8 -
    A topcoat that matches the original luster is to ensure that the color coating is fused to the primer and the top coat through the color coat. A gloss coating is first used like Microtop-54G for strength and aesthetic luster adjustment is either with a satin or matte.

    Step-9 -
    To reduce wear that develops into creases from impact stretching a non-stick, rub-resistant finishes conditioner is used like Protector-B/B+.

    Let me know what you think?

    Name:  RogerKoh-email.jpg
Views: 11
Size:  22.7 KB
    Roger Koh
    Leather, Skin & Hair Care System Formulator
    Consultant / Practitioner / Instructor / Coach
    web: www.leatherdoctor.com
    forum: www.leathercleaningrestorationforum.com
    email: roger@leatherdoctor.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    4

    Default

    I did forget to mention the cleaning.

    As for the current paint removal (I was curious if I would have to use a high grit sandpaper much akin to a scuff and shoot style job or use a "stripper" to remove the current dye). Would you recommend any reputable brand of remover be adequate for this?

    I will for sure add a hydrator to the "stripped" leather to improve suppleness and soften the leather to reduce further cracking. Should I be concerned with the creasing on the seats about further deterioration or would the hydrator make the leather soft enough before respray I shouldn't have worry?

    So, the Adhesion-73 Scrub would work both as a stripper and primer? That would be a nice product to use if I'm understanding correctly.

    They dye I have, I honestly don't know the name as it was in a kit I purchased, can be thinned as needed to make a thin layer without running so I should be safe there.

    For the top coat, if I'm understanding correctly, I'll use a gloss coating then adjust it from there with another spray of a more matte or satin finish?

    For long lasting protection, after cure time, I'll use Geyon Leather Shield (I have it in my mom's leather Grand Cherokee and love it) for chemical and mechanical protection.

    Thank you so much for your input and help Roger! I love being able to learn another skill to better care for my car.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Greater Vancouver, Canada.
    Posts
    4,806

    Default

    >>> As for the current paint removal (I was curious if I would have to use a high grit sandpaper much akin to a scuff and shoot style job or use a "stripper" to remove the current dye). Would you recommend any reputable brand of remover be adequate for this?

    It is very risky to remove current paint by sanding. When the leather crust is sand, it rough up, or suede, and texture is altered different from the rest of the surface. Stripping with a leather safe stripper is recommended with a pH value of 2.3 like Stripper-2.3. This low pH water leather stripper controls the leather crust from denaturing. In comparison with using a high pH value, the leather will stiff up, and without replacing the removed fatliquor (far and oil). The leather will develop creases soon that lead to premature cracks.


    >>> I will for sure add a hydrator to the "stripped" leather to improve suppleness and soften the leather to reduce further cracking.


    Hydrator-3.3 is the preconditioner for Fatliquor-5.0. It is the fatliquor (fat and oil) that supple or soften the leather when dry. The Hydrator-3.3, one of its functions is to relax the stiff leather structure and separates the stick together fibers to make way for the Fatliquor-5.0 to distributes throughout the leather fiber structure. Thus Hydrator-3.3 alone without following with Fatliquor-5.0 is product, time and effort wasted.


    >>> Should I be concerned with the creasing on the seats about further deterioration or would the hydrator make the leather soft enough before respray I shouldn't have worry?


    When leather dries of it original fatliquor content from about 14%, creases starts to show. The fatliquor content in the leather structure is like the fluids of a motor vehicle and need constant top up to maintain its integrity.


    >>> So, the Adhesion-73 Scrub would work both as a stripper and primer? That would be a nice product to use if I'm understanding correctly.

    Yes, residual random that still remains is removed with Adhesor-73 that does not cause denaturing of the leather. Stripper-2.3 is best limited to removing the finishes and should avoid contact with the leather crust, otherwise the cleaned leathers becomes too dry.


    >>> They dye I have, I honestly don't know the name as it was in a kit I purchased, can be thinned as needed to make a thin layer without running so I should be safe there.


    It is the binder or glue that carries the pigment. Paint durability depends very much on the ingredients of the binder. A micro-pigment also plays a part in terms of thickness. Since I use the products myself through the years, and has proven that Micro-54 is a superior product in terms of UV strength (for outdoor use). flexibility, stretchability, etc are all attributes that a refinished leather remains at par with OEM of the highest standard.

    >>> For the top coat, if I'm understanding correctly, I'll use a gloss coating then adjust it from there with another spray of a more matte or satin finish?


    Yes, a duller such as Duller-63 could be used to custom the MicroTop-54G to your desire satisfaction.


    >>> For long lasting protection, after cure time, I'll use Geyon Leather Shield (I have it in my mom's leather Grand Cherokee and love it) for chemical and mechanical protection.


    A generic name is more reliable in an open system practice in modern day tannery, we follow the same standard. Thus a non-stick, rub-resistant, buttery-feel protection with Protector-B or B+ will certainly bring the feel to a higher level, even a ballpoint will not continuous spill its nasty in. You may make a test myself to experience.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Roger,

    Thank you so much for your help and sharing of knowledge! I will begin ordering these products you recommended and will use your steps to complete this restoration in the next week or two. The wealth of knowledge you provided will not go without waste.

    - Aaron

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •