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Thread: Sofa Sectional - worn, faded. Can it be restored?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
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    Default Sofa Sectional - worn, faded. Can it be restored?

    Two sections of my sectional sofa are really worn. Can this be restored. Any advice is appreciated.

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  2. #2
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    >>> Two sections of my sectional sofa are really worn.

    To smooth out the surface worn used Adhesor-73 as a repair system before either Aniline-76 system
    http://www.leatherdoctor.com/kit-a7-...finishing-kit/
    or Micro-54 system
    http://www.leatherdoctor.com/kit-sa7...finishing-kit/
    to match existing finishes back to the original. This leather will need further identification.


    >>> Can this be restored.

    Yes, it can be restored. Remember that leather is a recycle material. And it can be recycle many times over. An important consideration is to restore back to the original finishes to retain its value back to the original new again.

    Further questions are welcome.

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    Roger Koh
    Leather, Skin & Hair Care System Formulator
    Consultant / Practitioner / Instructor / Online-Life-Coaching
    online store: www.leatherdoctor.com
    forum: www.leathercleaningrestorationforum.com
    email: roger@leatherdoctor.com

  3. #3
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    Mar 2019
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    Default : Sofa Sectional - worn, faded. Can it be restored?

    You said: 'This leather will need further identification.'

    How is this done?

  4. #4
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    "This leather will need further identification."

    How is further identification done?

  5. #5
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    >>> How is further identification done?

    The most accurate would be a sample swatch, normally found under the seat cushion.
    An example you see here:
    http://www.leathercleaningrestoratio...ight-scratches

    Label on the seat cushion itself may reveal the finishes type as well, but not very reliable.

    Large pictures will also help.

    Close-up will also help.

    The reverse suede side will also help.

    Actual testing with Stripper-2.3 will confirm the findings.

  6. #6
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    Mar 2019
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    "This leather will need further identification."

    Thank you for the response. I did not find a label that could help identify the leather. But, I do have larger pictures and a swatch. Hopefully this will help in identifying the leather so I can be sure and get the the correct info on how to restore it.

    Thank you
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  7. #7
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    Picture #1 - “Pebble-Grain”

    In comparing with the sample, the pebble grain has flattened out from friction rubs and pressure. The dryness of its orginal fatliquor also contributes to the thinning out. There are two version of pebble grain, one is by plating under heat and pressure or embossing and is stiffer then the softer version by reverse boarding to loosen up the grain. An example is the straight-line stapling that created an indent. When weakening embossing impression is relaxed by Hydrator-3.3 it might loose some of its sharpness. Unlike created by reverse boarding the texturing and softness is rejuvenated by laying the grain against each other and rub (this is possible to those panel that can be zip out). When Protector-B/B+ is applied on a regular interval, the surface wear will be prolonged to save on color refinishing.


    Picture #2 - “Reverse Suede-Side”


    In a typical aniline leather finish, the suede side color is very close to the front. This contrast of color does not indicate that this leather is aniline finished. This picture also shows opacity finishes typical from pigment finishes like Micro-54 system.


    Picture #3 - “Fading”


    Pigmented finishes in general is stronger to fading then Aniline. However, we still see some contrast in color from sample and color should be matched to the sample. The finishes also loose some luster as compare to the sample. This comparable MicroTop-54 is available in gloss, satin and matte to match original sample.


    Picture #4 & #5 - “Embossing”

    These texture patterns suggest that it is done by heat and pressure embossing plating rather then by “reverse-boarding”.

    Any questions you may have?

    Leather Doctor Kit-Sa7.cl is recommended for refinishing this leather back to its original finish.
    http://www.leatherdoctor.com/kit-sa7...finishing-kit/
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    See DIY color shading examples:
    http://www.leatherdoctor.com/color-p...ding-examples/

    Or, If you prefer custom matching services:
    http://www.leatherdoctor.com/color-matching-services/

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