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Thread: Ford F350 King Ranch Leather Seat

  1. #1
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    Default Ford F350 King Ranch Leather Seat

    I would like suggestions on what products to use and pricing on quantities sufficient to do full interior. I expect quart sizes at minimum. concentrates may be preferred if possible. I would like to avoid dyeing at least for now.
    Any help is appreciated.

    More pics of this in my album. it looks much worse in pics than in person.
    Attached Images Attached Images      
    Last edited by WI F350; 10-07-2013 at 07:46 PM.

  2. #2
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    Pictures shows severe sweat damages to the armrest and to the steering wheel.

    Leather is an “amphoteric” material and is pH sensitive, sweat when ferments turns alkaline and shift the leather protein fiber ionic negative (-ve). This phenomenon cause the weakening of the ionic attraction between the positive (+ve) leather protein fiber and its leather constituents like the tanning agent, fatliquor and dyestuff. To correct this alkaline over exposure from body oil, sweat and sweat contamination will need Degreaser-2.2 >Acidifier-2.0 system to revert leather denaturing into rawhide.

    This Degreaser-2.2 > Acidifier-2.0 process will be recommend for the entire interior with concentration on the worst affected deteriorating armrest and steering wheel with an extra process to wick penetrated contamination to the surface with Hydrator-3.3. Skin damages are work out with help of leather Eraser-4 and 2000grit sanding to exfoliate the damaged skin. The hydrating process may be repeated until result shows satisfactorily before moving into fatliquor replenishing.

    Hydrator-3.3 > Fatliquor-5.0 system returns the leather to its desired softness with strength.

    Repairs to the surface will impart a darkening effect and will be decided after drying from the fatliquor steps.

    Topcoat is recommended to seal the leather raw grain, while dyeing is an option.

    Protector-B+ is recommended to reduce friction rubs.

    Roger Koh
    Leather Care Consultant



    Products mentioned are found in this Kit A6.tc, individual products are found in this on-line store:
    http://www.leatherdoctor.com/servlet/StoreFront


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    Leather Doctor Kit A6.tc – Aniline Leather Topcoat Refinishing Kit
    Leather Doctor® Kit A6.tc, aniline leather topcoat refinishing kit is designed for topcoat repairs from friction wear, accidental scratch, scuff and abrasion to deteriorating greasy sweat stains. These topcoat damages are identified as white, dull or darkening stain from bare body contacts. Accidental whitish damages in most cases are free of soiling and direct AnilineTop-21G application with in between dry sanding rectifies most damages. Repairs to topcoat from daily wears that dulls will require a degreasing to remove penetrated rub-in soiling prior to topcoat application in a sequence process including Degreaser-2.2 follows with Rinse-3.0; Hydrator-3.3 follows with Fatliquor-5.0 prior to topcoat application. In a greasy and sweaty topcoat damaged areas especially to the headrest and armrest, a deep degreasing is essential follows with Acidifier-2.0 to stabilize the hydrogen bonding between the protein fibers with the other leather constituent like the tanning agent, dyestuff and fatliquor. This deep degreasing process is assisted by leather Eraser-4 in both the wet and dry cleaning process to remove soiling particulates off the leather surface. Hydrator-3.3 helps in the colloidal water movement bringing suspended soiling particulates to resurface through a dwelling and wicking process. Fat and oil is replenished by Fatliquor-5.0 in an emulsion form to penetrate into the leather structure. Once the fat and oil is hydrogen bond with the protein fiber, the water content breaks free leaving a breathing space for natural transpiration. The fat plumps the leather with fullness preventing the leather structure from collapsing during compressing and flexing while the oil lubricates the fiber from sliding smoothly over one another like millions of connecting hinges. Protector-B+ impart a non-stick, rub-resistant surface with a buttery feel helps reduce friction wear to the topcoat and extended a high level of appearance for a longer period of time. When the leather is contaminated with foreign soiling, it is essential to look at topcoat refinishing in a holistic approach. Note that the cleaning and rejuvenating products suffix denotes its pH value in this leather-safe aniline leathers topcoat refinishing system.

  3. #3
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    I am about to order. Could you suggest quantities to purchase in sufficient amounts to complete restoration of complete interior? this is a four door with front and rear seats.
    Thank you...

  4. #4
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    A complete restoration without dyeing would involve the following general processes:

    General Preparation for Topcoat Refinishing:

    Product System - Degreaser-2.2 > Acidifier-2.0 / Rinse-3.0.
    Tools – Horsehair Brush-1 / Leather Eraser-4 / Razor-60 / 2000grit / Terry Towel.

    Leather Rejuvenating:
    Hydrator-3.3 > Fatliquor-5.0

    Topcoat Refinishing:
    AnilineTop-21 (choice of gloss or matte, satin is a mix of gloss and matte).

    Non-Stick, Rub-Resistant Protector:
    Protector-B+ or scentless Protector-B

    Suggest refills add-on to the Kit A6.tc (may not suggest that they are exactly sufficient but available in the more economical larger packing or minimum concentrates).

    1. Degreaser-2.2 = Quart (RTU)
    2. Rinse-3.0 = 30ml con (= 2.56 RTU quarts)
    3. Acidifier-2.0 = 60ml con (= 1.64 RTU quarts)
    4. Hydrator-3.3 = 60ml con (= 1.64 RTU quarts)
    5. Fatliquor-5.0 = 250ml con (= 1.58 RTU quarts)
    6. AnilineTop-21 (matte or gloss) = Quart (RTU)
    7. d'Protein-10 = 250ml
    8. Tools: Razor-60

    Products are found in this on-link link: http://www.leatherdoctor.com/servlet/StoreFront



    The steering wheel and the armrest may require special attention.
    The darkening color effect may remain obvious and any repairs may amplify it naturally.

    Unknown stains may remain and will need specialty stain removing products, other than simply degreasing it.
    Other problem areas may reveal after degreasing and have to address according to this Aniline Leather Problem Solving Guide.


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    Roger Koh
    Leather Care Consultant
    www.LeatherDoctor.com
    Last edited by Roger Koh; 10-14-2013 at 12:19 PM.

  5. #5
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    Thanks again... I do not find a listing for item 7. d'Protein-10 = 250ml
    all tools are in the kit except the razor-60 is not included in kit is this correct?

  6. #6
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    Protein stains tends to coagulate and may need help from d’Protein-10, after degreasing.

    And any other unknown stains may need corresponding specialty products accordingly to the guide.

    Refer the use of d’Protein-10 from the Guide under – Protein Based: Milk, Vomit and Body-Fluids Stains.
    Products available from this link: http://www.leatherdoctor.com/servlet...-dsh-10/Detail

    Razor-60 helps to shave off deteriorated topcoat much easier and is available from this link: http://www.leatherdoctor.com/servlet...-dsh-60/Detail

  7. #7
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    wow...O.K.
    so this is a total of approximately $700 dollars American? How much for shipping?
    what would this typically cost to have professionally restored?

  8. #8
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    >>> How much for shipping?

    Shipping cost is based on weight and to save on shipping choose either “Fill-Up” or concentrates when doing the check-out in this on-line store: http://www.leatherdoctor.com/servlet/StoreFront

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    >>> What would this typically cost to have professionally restored?

    At this point of time there is no information on cost of professional restoration pricing only available is comparing with new replacement by Kevvy55 below:

    Quote
    I anticipate spending ~$800 for the chemicals and other various material to restore my King Ranch leather seats. While this may sound expensive, I have to say that I did an unbelieveable amount of research before investing in Roger's system. My son is a Master Certified mechanic for Ford and one of the first things that I did was to price replacement covers for the the front seats, armrests and console cover. Using his discount, it would have cost ~$2900! That did NOT include the back seats! EBay has used seats that appear to be in good condition however, a I priced a few sets that were in the $3200 - $4000 range...again, too rich for my blood! Roger's system is hands down THE way to go. Every step in the process is designed to bring the leather back to it's natural PH level of ~ 2 - 3. I'm not a chemist or scientist (actually an Electrical Engineer by degree) but what he says is very logical in terms of restoring the leather: all of the nutrients have been depleted from the leather over time due to heat, cold, body oils, spills, stains, etc and the only way to restore this type of leather (aniline) is to follow Roger's process. It just works. I'll post pictures of work as I make progress. BTW - I'm estimating that the complete restoration of ALL of my seats will take ~20 - 25 hours. Yep, a lot of time, sweat and elbow grease but it beats spending >$3000. Unquote.

    Roger Koh
    Leather Care Consultant
    www.LeatherDoctor.com
    Last edited by Roger Koh; 10-15-2013 at 10:21 AM.

  9. #9
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    Hi WI 350

    I'm the guy that Roger quoted above - Kevvy55. Check out my thread (http://www.leathercleaningrestoratio...at-restoration) - I'm actually right in the middle of restoring my seats - your KR looks to be the same age as mine (2005). I've spent ~$900 to date and I beleive that this should cover all of my chemical needs. I've posted some pictures wrt my progress and will post more as time permits. I will have to say that this is a LOT of work but the payoff looks to be there. I would NOT recommend dyeing the leather as I experienced a very dark finish that came no where near matching the original KR color. Also, I skipped the "Adhesor73" step on my leather as it also darkened the leather significantly and I ended up completely stripping the Adhesor 73 off the leather. The end results have still left the leather much darker that I wanted but it still beats ~$3000 for new KR covers from Ford (just for the front seats, and console cover!). If you read my thread, you'll see the steps I followed. I took the back seat out of my truck thsi past weekend and have it sitting on a stack of concrete blocks in my garage. This makes it SO much easier to work on, not to meniton I can focus lighting on the seat as I work on it.

    THE hardest part of the process is stripping the leather. I've used Roger's "Stripper" product but I've also found that using Acetone works as well. Roger will surely disagree with my suggestion on the Acetone but it's ~ $16/ gal at Lowes... You MUST (underline 100 times!) get ALL of the finish off of the leather otherwise your finish will be blotchy - caused by absorbtion differences in the leather; ie - completly stripped leather fully absorbs the chemicals vs partially. You'll see the results of NOT stripping all of the finish in my thread - it's the first FINISHED picture of the console cover. Mistakes I made on this piece: didn't strip it completly and also used the Aniline 76 dye. I wound up completely stripping the leather again and starting over. You'll see the final result further-down in my thread...the results are MUCH better and the color looks very close to a new KR of that year. Back to the stripping part...I've used a clean cloth w/the Acetone and basically scrubbed the leather to remove the finish. I followed this step w/the Leather Eraser. A LOT OF WORK! I'm experimenting w/various other methods of removing the finish - Mr Clean Eraser (limited success...works well as the FINAL leather eraser; ie - once you've already removed most of the finish). I'm also experimenting with a Scotch Brite sponge/ scrubber; I'm applying the Acetone with the sponge side and LIGHTLY scrubbing the finsh. I'm doing this in a very inconspicuous place as I want to make sure that the leather isn't permanently scratched. So far, so good interms of: 1) removing the finish more efficiently and, 2) taking less time. If Roger's reading this post, I would ask him for his opinion on the best/ easiest/ most efficient way to remove the finish.This is tough work!

    Your leather has additional problem and wear that mine doesn't - you may also need some of the additional chems to remove otehr stains.

    Good luck and check my thread for updates.

  10. #10
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    >>> If Roger's reading this post, I would ask him for his opinion on the best/ easiest/ most efficient way to remove the finish. This is tough work!

    Removing old and deteriorated finishes is best performed during the Acidifier-2.0 / Rinse-3.0 and after Degreaser-2.2 while the leather structure is saturated. Using products that have a pH value of 2.2, 2.0 and 3.0 all contributes to protonate the protein fiber ionic positive (+ve) that re-strengthens the leather fiber making the stripping of the topcoat easier with Razor-60 (a circular sharp blade for shaving the deteriorated finishes). This can be follow-up with Eraser-4 and fine 2000grit sanding.
    Remaining stronger finishes on unused areas will require to be chemically stripped with Stripper-2.3 (pH 2.3). Acetone pH averages 7 when used straight from the tin is recommended to be neutralized with Acidifier-2.0 thereafter.

    Remember that leather is an amphoteric material, the protein fiber being ionic positive (+ve) hydrogen bond with its other non-amphoteric ionic negative (-ve) leather constituents like the tanning agent, fatliquor and dyestuff. Charging the protein fiber ionic positive or protonate with pH value below its isoelectric point (pI) will prevent the leather from denaturing or reverting to rawhide. The steering wheel and the handrest from above pictures shows the denaturing of the leather and the culprit is sweat that when ferments with the natural bacteria from the atmosphere shift the protein fiber ionic negative (-ve) that repels the other ionic negative (-ve) leather constituents resulting in what we see leather reverting to rawhide. Preventive care from sweat damages is routine rinsing with Rinse-3.0 (pH 3.0) to pH balance the sweat from shifting alkaline.

    Always know the pH value of product we used to prevent denaturing of the leather. So if acetone is used always pH balance it with Acidifier-2.0.
    It is also mandatory to hydrate and fatliquor replenish it thereafter to prevent leather dryness and return the leather with softness and strength.
    Last edited by Roger Koh; 10-24-2013 at 11:05 AM.

  11. #11
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    How do we know if the leather is reverting to rawhide?

    Tips:
    Wet it with tap water and feel it – it would be tacky, sticky or slimy.
    Apply Acidifier-2.0 to it and the condition improves – a healthy leather will give a squeaky feel.

  12. #12
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    [QUOTE=Kevvy55;14055]Hi WI 350

    I'm the guy that Roger quoted above - Kevvy55.


    I have little doubt of the potential of Rogers methods...I am shocked at cost but will be ordering soon. that kind of cash is not freely available at this time of year. sadly the previous owner tried to keep this one with out without proper leather care. I have learned a great deal from rogers posts on this forum and others. had I known of the cost of restoring these seats I may have kept shopping for a king ranch with a cleaner interior.
    Thanks for your reply...I hope this works well for both of us.

  13. #13
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    Immediate attention is to do a tap water testing to see how the deteriorated armrest and steering response as I mention above.

    Stopping the leather reversing to rawhide should not wait - only used Acidifier-2.0.


    Product information from http://www.leatherdoctor.com/servlet/StoreFront


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    Leather Doctor® Acidifier-2.0 is a waterbased pH 2.0 leather acidifier designs for controlling dye bleeding in conjunction with Degreaser-2.2 in extreme prolong oil, grease and sweat decontamination system. As a standalone, it is for pH balancing alkaline overexposure that manifest as marks, streaks, brightness and tackiness. This universal acidifier is for all leather types including pigmented, aniline, vachetta, nubuck, suede, hair-on-hide and woolskin leather types.

    Instructions:

    Degreasing-Rinse System:
    1. Spray direct sufficiently and agitate with appropriate leather horsehair brush-1, nubuck nylon brush-2 or suede brass brush-3.
    2. Towel extract suspended soiling until it shows clean.

    Standalone for Rectifying Alkaline Overexposure:
    1. Spray direct sufficiently and agitate with appropriate leather horsehair brush-1, nubuck nylon brush-2 or suede brass brush-3.
    2. Dwell 10 to 30 minutes depending on exposure severity.
    3. Extract residues with dry absorbent towel.

  14. #14
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    we shall see how it goes...product ordered.
    any cautions or tips are welcome...

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